2 Replies Latest reply on Jan 29, 2018 3:03 PM by user_78878863

    PSoC6: connecting clock to Timer Counter or Sync

    user_78878863

      Hi,

       

      I want to connect a clock component to the count input of a Timer Counter component. When I do so, I get the error message:

      Error: mpr.M0119: Invalid connection for clock "RefClock" connected to "\RefCounter:TCPWM\:count". (App=cydsfit)

      (RefClock is a 1MHz clock derived from the 50MHz Clk_Peri, and RefCounter is a 32bit Timer Counter component, whose 'clock' input is connected to Clk_Peri/2 for synchronization.

      I also tried to sync the 1MHz RefClock to Clk_Peri/2 using a Sync component, but I get the same error:

      Error: mpr.M0119: Invalid connection for clock "RefClock" connected to "\Sync_1:genblk1[0]:INST\:in". (App=cydsfit)

      How can I solve this?

        • 1. Re: PSoC6: connecting clock to Timer Counter or Sync
          NidhinM_71

          Hello,

           

          In PSoC 6, clocks are routed separately from other digital signals. Clocks can be connected only to the clock inputs of components. If you want to connect a clock to the count input of a TCPWM, you should convert the clock into a signal, for example, using a T Flip-Flop, as shown in the  following image:

           

          ClockToCount.PNG

          That being said, there could be other, easier methods to achieve what you need without using such a circuit. Can you please give more information about the application ?

           

          Thanks

          Nidhin

          • 2. Re: PSoC6: connecting clock to Timer Counter or Sync
            user_78878863

            So the PSoC6 works like the PSoC4 in this regard, right? I need to look up the blog posts on its clocking system and refresh my memories.

            My use case is build a reciprocal frequency counter, and the part I was working on was the reference count (which is clocked by a fixed frequency). Probably this can also be done by a PWM component, but I would need whether I can access the internal state when its stopped.