1 Reply Latest reply on Nov 14, 2017 10:34 PM by gsns

    How to identify SPI

    user_512313589

      I need the way to keep software in common in preparation for future development SPI.

      Please give me advice how to prepare.

       

      I strongly feel the need, because S25FL-T ’s development seems to be just prepared on Cypress roadmap.

      http://www.cypress.com/product-roadmaps/cypress-flash-memory-roadmap

       

      Some command definitions is different for each SPI product.

      I think that the behavior of Erase command(D8h) is most important.

        (S25FL064L) D8h means 64kB sector erase.

        (S25FL256L) D8h means 64kB sector erase.

        (S25FL512S) D8h means 256kB sector erase.

        (S25FL512T) What does D8h mean?  64kB or 256kB?

      The system should be prepared as follows;

      • Equip with both 64 kB and 256 kB sub-routines.
      • Identify which type of SPI is mounted on the board.
      • Choice appropriate sub-routine, according to the identified

       

      Please give me advice how to identify which type of SPI is mounted on the board.

      I feel that SFDP parameter is useful for this case. Please confirm it.

      Or, if you have other easier ways, please let me know.

       

      (Previous conversation)

      https://community.cypress.com/thread/31423

      >> There is no special/specific reason.

      I understand that the Device ID definition have no rules, but that's why I believe the ID should not be used to identify future products.

       

      Best regards

        • 1. Re: How to identify SPI
          gsns

          Hello Saito San,

           

          S25F512T family is in the road map and we do not yet have the preliminary datasheet ready for this part . So we can not comment on the D8h meaning in S25FL512T now.

          Regarding the identification of SPI we recommend you to read Device ID to know the density and family to which it belongs and choose sub routine accordingly. Device ID will be useful because it is different for different densities and different families.

           

          Thanks,

          Krishna.