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PSoC 4 MCU

RoRo_4142061
New Contributor

Hello,

Looking at J9 at SCHEM1 seems to represent J9 on SCHEM2 which seems to suggest that depending on the jumper of J9, the PSoC 4 and PSoC 5LP chips will be powered by either the USB's 5VDC or the 3.3VDC via the LDO power supply system. The jumper chosen on J9 will represent the VDD volatge throughout the parts connections. (Please confirm if I am assuming this correctly!)

 

In SCHEM3, we have VCCD??? Where does this come from???

 

Thank you 

All help appreciated

r

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1 Solution
BiBi_1928986
Valued Contributor

Hello.

Your observations are correct regarding J9 selecting 3.3V or 5V for all parts connections.

Vccd is an internal PSoC voltage regulator at 1.8Volts.  It only needs a capacitor connected to this pin (as shown in SCHEM3).  On KIT-042, you do not need to do anything with Vccd.

Read PSoC 4 family datasheet "Power" chapter and find more information.  In the future, if you make your own pcb design, follow the schematic from KIT-042 for power supply connections.  It's extremely important to use Vccd properly.  In general, it only needs a capacitor.  It doesn't connect to ANYTHING else.  If the PSoC is being powered from 1.8V (instead of 3.3v or 5V), there are options shown in the "Power" chapter.

But for now, enjoy KIT-042.  Lots of things to do with it.

Good luck with your project.

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BiBi_1928986
Valued Contributor

Hello.

Your observations are correct regarding J9 selecting 3.3V or 5V for all parts connections.

Vccd is an internal PSoC voltage regulator at 1.8Volts.  It only needs a capacitor connected to this pin (as shown in SCHEM3).  On KIT-042, you do not need to do anything with Vccd.

Read PSoC 4 family datasheet "Power" chapter and find more information.  In the future, if you make your own pcb design, follow the schematic from KIT-042 for power supply connections.  It's extremely important to use Vccd properly.  In general, it only needs a capacitor.  It doesn't connect to ANYTHING else.  If the PSoC is being powered from 1.8V (instead of 3.3v or 5V), there are options shown in the "Power" chapter.

But for now, enjoy KIT-042.  Lots of things to do with it.

Good luck with your project.

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RoRo_4142061
New Contributor

 

 

Also, while I am waiting for my kit to arrive I was looking over the training videos and I was wondering 

after I finish all the training videos will I be able to do examples on my own like SPI, bootloader (program MCU's flash), wifi etc...? or is there a more advanced series of videos?

 

 

 

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BiBi_1928986
Valued Contributor

Hi RoRo.

Yes, that is the correct datasheet for PSoC 4245 on KIT-042.
And Yes, that is the Power section to read.

The KIT-042 Guide, has lots of links to the technical data.
CY8CKIT-042 PSoC 4 Pioneer Kit Guide (cypress.com)

As you know, PSoC Creator is the s/w development environment.  When Creator is installed, it has pre-loaded MANY-MANY example projects that you can try, modify.  So, I would start with some of the examples for SPI, UART, LCD, etc.  And yes, it includes Bootloading code too.

And, there are 100 projects for KIT-042 at element14 website.
100 Projects in 100 Days | element14 | Cypress Kits

Have fun!!!

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RoRo_4142061
New Contributor

Thanks Bill

r

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