CCGX FAQs – KBA97244

Version: *D

 

Question: What is the difference between USB Power Delivery (USB PD) and USB Type-C?

 

Answer: USB-Power Delivery (USB PD) is a specification standard that supports power delivery up to 100 W while transmitting data over the same cable at same time. USB Type-C is a new reversible USB connector specification that can support a number of new standards including USB 3.1 (Gen 1 and Gen 2), Display Port, and USB PD. The USB Type-C ports, by default, can support the power of 5 V up to 3A. If the USB Type-C port is implemented with USB PD, it can support up to 100 W as defined in the USB PD specification. Therefore, having a USB Type-C port does not mean that it supports USB PD.

 

Question: Is the USB Type-C connector mandatory for USB3.1 Gen1 or Gen2 specifications? Is USB Type-C identical to USB 3.0/3.1?

 

Answer: No. The USB Type-C specification is independent of the USB3.1 Gen1 or Gen2 specification. For now, we can have USB systems with Type-A or Type-B legacy connectors supporting Gen1 or Gen2 specification. The USB Type-C specification is a new connector specification defined by USB-IF, which supports reversible connection with power delivery up to 100W. Any USB 3.1 Gen1 or Gen2 products can be designed with a USB Type-C connector.

 

Question: What do DFP, DRP, and UFP stand for?

 

Answer: Downstream Facing Port (DFP) is a USB Type-C port on a host or a hub to which devices are connected. Upstream Facing Port (UFP) is a USB Type-C port on a device or a hub that connects to a host or DFP of a hub. Dual Role Port (DRP) is a USB Type-C port that can operate as a DFP or UFP.

 

Note: DRP and USB-PD DRP differ from each other. USB-PD DRP refers to the port’s power role that can act as Power Source (Provider) and Sink (Consumer). For example, a laptop’s USB Type-C port supports USB-PD DRP that can act as a power source (when connected to a device such as a flash drive or mobile phone) and as a sink (when connected to a monitor or power adaptor).

 

Question: What is the Configuration Channel (CC) line? What is the maximum speed of the CC bus?

 

Answer: The CC bus is the data line on which USB PD communications take place between port partners and EMCA. Of the two pins, CC1 and CC2 in a USB Type-C receptacle, one of the pins is identified as the CC line based on the plug orientation at USB Type-C connection. For a USB Type-C plug, the CC line is fixed.

 

The CC line performs the following functions:

  • Detects USB Type-C plug orientation to establish USB data bus routing
  • Detects USB port attachment, such as DFP to UFP
  • Establish DFP and UFP roles between port partners
  • Discovers and configures VBUS
  • Configures VCONN
  • Discovers and configures optional Alternate and Accessory modes

The bit rate on the CC line can vary from 270 Kbps to 330 Kbps with a nominal value of 300 Kbps. For details, see the “Physical Layer Signaling Schemes” section of the USB-PD 2.0 specification.

 

Question: What is the difference between Cypress’ USB-PD 2.0 and Qualcomm®’s Quick Charge™ (QC)?

 

Answer: USB-PD 2.0 is a USB-IF defined protocol, which provides a standardized mechanism for power delivery between USB devices at up to 100 W (20 V at 5 A) while simultaneously supporting both USB and non-USB data signals on the USB Type-C port. It enables the host and peripheral to dynamically negotiate power direction.

QC is a Qualcomm-defined proprietary charging protocol used for charging devices that support the Qualcomm Quick Charge protocol using a custom charger, which also supports the protocol. Quick Charge 2.0 delivers up to 60 W but, unlike USB-PD, does not support simultaneous power and data transfer or dynamic selection of the power direction during charging.

For more details on USB-PD 2.0, refer to the USB-PD 2.0 specification.

 

Question: What is the maximum number of source power delivery objects (PDOs) supported by a Cypress USB-PD controller? What are the supported power profiles?

 

Answer: Cypress USB-PD implementation supports up to seven PDOs for source and sink applications.

There is no mandate by the USB-PD spec on what power profiles need to be supported by an application. The source and sink PDOs depend on design requirements. Section A.1 of the USB Type-C specification defines a standardized set of voltages with different current ranges. Note that the power profiles defined in Section A.1 are only recommended power profiles and are not mandatory. However, there should be at least one source PDO supporting 5 V.

 

Question: Can I use a USB Type-C port for only USB and standard 5 V on VBUS?

 

Answer: Yes, you can use USB Type-C ports with USB-only capability and standard 5-V VBUS support.

 

For Host: The host Type-C port can provide 5 V with either 3 A or 1.5 A, default port current for USB 2.0 (500 mA) or USB 3.0 (900 mA). The USB Type-C host indicates its current capabilities by advertising an appropriate pull-up resistor, Rp, on both the CC lines - CC1 and CC2.

 

For Client / Device: The USB Type-C only devices need to advertise a pull-down resistor Rd of 5.1K on its CC line. If the device has a USB Type-C receptacle, it needs to advertise Rd on both CC1 and CC2 lines. However, for devices with Type-C plugs, the Rd is connected only to the CC line.

 

Question: How do USB Type-C devices handle VBUS voltages other than 5 V?

 

Answer: If a device needs to sink any voltage other than 5 V, it should be capable of USB PD communication. The USB PD source sends its power profiles in the source capabilities to the device. The device requests for one of the advertised power profiles depending on its sink capabilities. After a contract is established, the host provides the requested voltage on VBUS.

 

 

EZ-PD CCGx Product FAQs

 

Question: What do the family names CCG1/CCG2 stand for?

 

Answer: CCG1 and CCG2 belong to Cypress’ USB Type-C Controller Generation 1/Generation 2 device families.

 

Question: How do I get started on designing with CCGx?

 

Answer: You can watch the training video to understand about USB Type-C and Power Delivery. The datasheets and application notes can help you understand how to use the CCGx devices for your applications. Refer to KBA204071- “Getting started with Cypress USB Type-C Products” for further details. You can reach the Cypress Applications Engineering Team using the Online Tech Support Case System.

 

Question: What are the packages in which CCG1 and CCG2 devices are available?

 

Answer: CCG1 devices are available in the following packages:

  • 35-pin WLCSP (6.8-mm2)
  • 40-pin QFN (36-mm2)
  • 16-pin SOIC (60-mm2)
  • 24-pin QFN (16-mm2)
  • 14-pin DFN (8.7-mm2)

 

Question: Is there a source code for CCGx devices? If not, how do customers modify the firmware?

 

Answer: The source code for CCGx is not open. Cypress is developing a SDK for the CCG2 device. The SDK will be available for various applications such as notebooks, dongles, and adapters. The SDK will include a base firmware library, tools, and documentation for customizing the code for applications, example code for applications, bootloader for in-system firmware update, and tools for customizing vendor IDs and profiles. The SDK is expected to be ready by early December 2015. There is no plan to support CCG1 in the SDK. Cypress recommends that customers use CCG2 for their new product development. Contact ccg_sw@cypress.com for any queries.

 

Question: What IDE can I use with CCGx? What are the capabilities of the IDE?

 

Answer: CCG2 and future CCG devices will be supported in PSoC Creator along with the SDK. This is expected to be available by early December 2015. The IDE can be used to configure the GPIOs and ADCs.

 

Question: What is the status of creating the Type-C component in PSoC Creator?

 

Answer: CCG2 and future CCG devices will be supported in PSoC Creator along with the SDK. This is expected to be available by early December 2015.

 

Question: Can CCGx support simultaneous USB SuperSpeed and 2-Lane Display port configuration?

 

Answer: Yes. Cypress has reference designs, which simultaneously support USB SuperSpeed and 2-Lane Display port configuration. Contact Cypress Technical Support for details.

 

Question: Does CCGx support a receptacle-based power adapter?

 

Answer: Yes, CCGx supports receptacle-based power adapter design. Contact Cypress Technical Support for the reference schematic.

 

Question: What Alternate modes does the CCGx firmware support?

 

Answer: CCGx firmware supports DisplayPort (DP) Alternate mode. Contact Cypress Technical Support for more information on other Alternate mode implementation.

 

Question: What are the different CCGx Manufacturing Part Numbers (MPNs) and which ones are recommended for various applications?

 

Answer: Refer to the Ordering Information section of the CCG1 datasheet and CCG2 datasheet. Each application needs different features and hence needs different MPNs. If there are non-standard applications (such as power bank) not covered in the datasheet, contact Cypress technical support to identify the right MPN. For more updates on USB Type-C controllers from Cypress, go to http://www.cypress.com/products/usb-type-c-and-power-delivery.

 

Question: What are the differences between the CCG1 and CCG2 devices?

 

Answer: The main differences between the CCG1 and CCG2 devices are as follows:

Item

CCG1

CCG2

GPIOs

30

14

VBUS Voltage and Current Monitoring

Present for V and I

Present for V or I

Smallest Footprint-WLCSP (mm2)

  1. 6.8
  2. 3.3

Integrated Termination Resistors and Isolation Elements

No

Yes

CCG2 is the next generation of CCG1 and has higher integration leading to lower BOM. CCG2 can be used for various applications such as notebooks, docks, monitors, and display adapters.

 

Question: Is the receptacle-based Type-C to DisplayPort solution supported?

 

Answer: No, the receptacle-based Type-C to DisplayPort (DP) solution is not supported due to lack of signal integrity (SI) budget in a DisplayPort system because the DisplayPort cable uses the entire SI budget. Hence, Type-C to DP/mDP (mini-DisplayPort) designs will have plugs on both ends and no DP/mDP receptacle.

 

Question: Does the CCG1 Power Delivery solution include current source implementation for the DFP CC termination?

 

Answer: No, the CCG1 Power Delivery solution does not implement current source implementation for the DFP CC line termination. The CC line termination is done by the Rp resistor only.

 

Question: With which version of the USB PD Specification do CCG1 and CCG2 comply?

 

Answer: CCGx is compliant with USB PD 2.0 and the Type-C 1.1 Specification. The firmware supports all the necessary layers and protocols documented in the USB-PD specification.

 

Question: Is CCGx backward-compatible with USB PD 1.0?

 

Answer: No, CCG1 is not backward-compatible with the legacy USB PD 1.0, which uses a binary frequency shift keying (BFSK)-based PD protocol that is different from the baseband-based PD 2.0 Specification.

 

Question: Do CCGx devices support 10 Gbps data rate? How can I evaluate and verify 10 Gbps data rate for a Type-C device with CCG1 and CCG2 devices?

 

Answer: The CCG1 and CCG2 devices are USB Type-C port controllers, which only take care of the power delivery portion of the USB Type-C port. The USB data lines do not pass through the CCG1 and CCG2 devices and they do not modify the data signals. The USB data signaling will take place at 10 Gbps data rate as long as both the USB host and device support USB3.1 Gen 2 signaling.

You can verify the data rate with any USB data analyzer such as Teledyne LeCroy.

 

Question: Does CCGx support all power profiles?

 

Answer: The Cypress USB Type-C controllers can be customized to support any power profiles defined in the USB PD specification.

 

Question: Can we modify CCGx's source PDOs to support the voltages required by the port partner?

 

Answer: Yes. You can modify the CCGx firmware for the required source capabilities. The AC-DC power section of the design should be capable of supporting the required source PDOs.

 

Question: Can the preconfigured PDOs be modified at runtime?

 

Answer: No. The current Cypress USB-PD implementation supports a maximum of seven source or sink PDOs and the PDOs are programmed into the CCGx device configuration table. It is possible to dynamically enable or disable specific PDOs. However, it is not possible to modify the PDOs at runtime.

 

Question: What is the Cypress roadmap for USB Type-C products?

 

Answer: Cypress is committed to USB Type-C and a series of Type-C controllers are under development. For details, check the Cypress USB roadmap.

 

Question: CCGx uses a simple checksum calculation to validate the firmware. Is there an alternative mechanism to validate the firmware other than checksum?

 

Answer: Yes. A simple authentication mechanism can be implemented to validate the firmware and there are other such alternative mechanisms that can be implemented. Cypress has been using “checksum” calculation to validate the firmware and there are no plans to change.

 

Question: What are the end applications that CCGx devices go into? Are there products in the market that support USB Type-C?

 

Answer: USB Type-C controllers, such as CCGx, are needed in products that have ports for power, USB, or display. A few products that fall in this category are notebooks, tablets, smart phones, docks, monitors, power adapters, hard disk drives, and the cables used between these devices. The scope of products covered under USB Type-C can increase with newer alternate modes being added by the USB IF. Since the middle of 2015, Apple, Google, and HP notebooks in the market have had a USB Type-C controller. The accessories for these devices also need USB Type-C controllers.

 

Question: Does the CCGx Type-C controller support overvoltage protection (OVP) and overcurrent protection (OCP) features?

 

Answer: Cypress’ EZ-PD CCG1 supports OVP using an internal ADC and needs external hardware to detect an overcurrent situation. However, both the features are enabled in firmware by default. Refer to CY4501 development kit schematic for more details on the hardware required to enable these features.

Cypress’ EZ-PD CCG2 needs external hardware to detect both the OVP and OCP; by default, these features are not enabled in the firmware. For implementing these features in the firmware and for the schematics, contact Cypress Tech support.

 

Question: What functionality is CCGx capable of in USB Type-C with Power Delivery?

 

Answer: CCGx acts as a USB Type-C controller that can do the following functions:

  • Detect the orientation of the Type-C plug and reroute the signals
  • Manage the power contract negotiation between the Provider and Consumer in a USB PD setup
  • Support simultaneous Display and Data signals
  • Negotiate Alternate modes

 

USB Type-C Cables and EMCA FAQs

 

Question: What is EMCA and when is it required?

 

Answer: EMCA stands for the Electronically Marked Cable Assembly. An EMCA incorporates electronics that provides a method to determine the characteristics of the cable, such as its current-carrying capability, performance, and vendor identification (USB Type-C Cable ID function). E-marking (or having a USB Type-C controller) on a USB Type-C cable is required under the following conditions:

  • If the USB Type-C cable is required to support more than 3A current
  • If the USB Type-C cable is a full featured cable, that is, if the cable supports either USB 3.1 Gen1 or USB 3.1 Gen2 signaling.

 

Question: What is VCONN_SWAP and when is it required?

 

Answer: The EMCA is powered by VCONN. The VCONN_SWAP message is used to request an exchange of VCONN Source for the EMCA cable. It may be sent by either Port Partner. Once the USB Type-C port connection is established between a host and a device, the CC signal in the USB Type-C receptacle of the host that is not used for CC communication will be repurposed as VCONN and host can power the cable and accessories via VCONN pin. Initially, the DFP capable of USB PD communication, detects an EMCA cable, and sources the VCONN. The source may be swapped if the battery of the DFP discharges to a point where it cannot source VCONN, and then the DFP can initiate VCONN_SWAP.

 

Question: What data can a Type-C cable carry?

 

Answer: The full-featured USB Type-C cable can carry USB2.0, USB3.1 Gen1, and USB3.1 Gen2 data in standard mode. When the port partners enter an alternate mode, the full-featured USB Type-C cable can carry the alternate mode data (such as Display Port and Thunderbolt) as well.

 

Question: What is the maximum power a Type-C cable can deliver?

 

Answer: The power capability of the USB Type-C cable is defined in terms of its current carrying capability. The USB Type-C cable can carry maximum of 5A current and only EMCA cables can support more than 3A current.

 

Question: Is it possible to design a Type-C cable that carries more power than that supported by Type-C and PD specifications?

 

Answer: Yes. But the design vendors must decide whether to qualify such non-standard designs. The USB Type-C connectors are designed to carry power up to 100 W (20 V, 5 A). Hence USB Type-C and USB-PD compliant cables can only carry power up to 100 W (20 V, 5 A). The power delivery of either more than 20 V or 5 A over the USB Type-C port is not defined by USB-IF and it is not recommended.

 

 

Question: How many EZ-PD CCG2 USB Type-C controllers are required for a USB Type-C cable?

 

Answer: The USB Type-C passive cable assembly requires an E-marker IC at one end of the cable. The USB Type-C active cable designs that have different functions at each end of the cable require an E-marker IC at both ends of the cable. The downstream facing port (DFP) will query the cable to know the features supported at each end of the cable.

For more details, refer to AN95615 - Designing USB 3.1 Type-C Cables Using EZ-PD™ CCG2.

 

Question: Does CCGx support cable compensation?

 

Answer: Yes, CCGx supports cable compensation by requesting for more voltage than what is required by the device, which helps to compensate the IR drop of the cable.

 

Question: How many external components can be reduced by migrating from a CCG1 Type-C controller to a CCG2 Type-C controller for a Type-C cable application?

 

Answer: In a single-chip EZ-PD CCG1-based cable solution, we need 11 resistors, 5 capacitors, 2 diodes, and 2 FETs, whereas in a single-chip EZ-PD CCG2-based cable design, we need only 1 resistor and 4 capacitors. In a dual-chip EZ-PD CCG1-based cable solution (one chip per Type-C plug), we need 22 resistors, 10 capacitors, and 4 FETs, whereas for a dual-chip EZ-PD CCG2-based cable design, we need only 2 resistors and 6 capacitors. Refer to the following tables for more details.

 

Single Chip Cable

External Components

EZ-PD™ CCG1

EZ-PD™ CCG2

BOM reduction

Resistor

11

1

10

Capacitor

5

4

1

Diode

2

0

2

FET

2

0

2

Total

20

5

15

 

Dual Chip Cable

External Components

EZ-PD™ CCG1

EZ-PD™ CCG2

BOM reduction

Resistor

22

2

20

Capacitor

10

6

4

FET

4

0

4

Total

36

8

28

For designing Type-C cables using CCG2, refer to the application note AN95615 - Designing USB 3.1 Type-C Cables Using EZ-PD™ CCG2.

 

Programming EZ-PD CCGx Products

 

Question: What are the various methods to program/upgrade the CCGx firmware for various USB Type-C solutions?

 

Answer: Cypress supports the following firmware upgrade methods for different CCGx-based USB Type-C solutions:

Application

SWD Programming

I2C Bootloading

CC Bootloading

Notebook Host

Yes

Yes

No

Monitor Client

Yes

Yes

No

EMCA

Yes

No

Yes

Type-C to DP Cable Solution

Yes

Yes

No

Power Adapter

Yes

No

Yes

 

Question: How do I upgrade or program the firmware of an EZ-PD CCGx device?

 

Answer: There are two ways to upgrade or program an EZ-PD CCGx device:

  1. Using the Cypress-provided PC utility, EZ-PD Configuration Utility, over the CC line, as explained in KBA97271.
  2. Using PSoC® Programmer and MiniProg3 programmer over the SWD interface; this method is preferred during product development or sometimes at the factory, as explained in KBA97271.

 

Question: What is EZ-PD Configuration Utility?

 

Answer: The Cypress EZ-PD controller is a highly configurable and programmable solution. The chip can be configured using parameters stored in the internal flash memory. These parameters are to be chosen and programmed by Cypress customers according to their use cases and requirements.

The EZ-PD Configuration Utility is a Microsoft Windows Application that guides the CCGx user through the process of configuring and programming the chip. The utility works in tandem with Cypress-supplied hardware, which hosts the CCGx controllers along with a USB interface. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) of the EZ-PD Configuration Utility allows users to intuitively select and configure the parameters for their application.

 

Question: Can we program the CCGx controllers with custom firmware during mass production or during product development?

 

Answer: Yes. Refer to the CCGx programming specification for details on programming during mass production.

For firmware programming during product development, you can use the EZ-PD Configuration Utility.

 

Question: How long does it take to load the application firmware in the CCGx controller over CC bus using EZ-PD Configuration Utility?

 

Answer: It takes around 30s to load the 20-KB application firmware in the CCGx controller over CC bus using EZ-PD Configuration Utility.

 

Question: What is the difference between a cyacd file and a hex file?

 

Answer: The EZ-PD CCGx controller consists of two types of bootloaders: CC and I2C. The CCG2 device allows the firmware of the assembled cable to be upgraded over the CC line through a built-in bootloader. The hex file consists of both the bootloader and application firmware for the CCGx controller whereas the cyacd file consists of only the application firmware.

The bootloader can be downloaded in the CCGx device using serial wire debug (SWD) pins. Application firmware can be downloaded using EZ-PD configuration utility over the CC line.

 

Question: What is the purpose of the configuration table in the CCGx controller? Where can I find configuration table definitions?

 

Answer: The EZ-PD CCGx controller is a highly reconfigurable solution. The configuration table stores various device parameters, PDO configuration, SVID configuration, PD port configuration, and miscellaneous information into CCGx’s internal flash memory. Thus, we can reconfigure the CCGx controller by only updating this configuration table without modifying the firmware using EZ-PD Configuration Utility. Once the configuration is complete, the configuration can be saved in the form of a Cypress-defined binary file called the cyacd file.

Refer to the section “EZ-PD Device Configuration” in the EZ-PD Device Configuration user manual for a detailed description about configuration table definitions and the section “Saving the Configuration” in the EZ-PD Device Configuration user manual for a detailed description about creation of configuration file.

 

Question: How do I configure CCGx (power delivery object (PDO)/ Power delivery profiles) without modifying the firmware?

 

Answer: The Cypress EZ-PD controller is a highly configurable and programmable solution. The chip can be configured using parameters stored in the internal flash memory. These parameters are to be chosen and programmed by Cypress customers according to their use cases and requirements.

EZ-PD configuration utility can be used to configure and program the CCGx controller. Refer to the EZ-PD Configuration utility user manual for more details.

 

Question: Does Cypress provide a tool to create a configuration file for the CCGx controller?

 

Answer: Yes. The EZ-PD Configuration utility can be used to create a configuration file. Refer to the section “Saving the Configuration” in EZ-PD Device Configuration Utility user manual for a detailed description.

 

Question: Can the CCGx controller store user-specific parameters for the user’s future product development?

 

Answer: Yes. User-specific parameters can be stored in the CCGx device configuration table using EZ-PD Configuration utility. Refer to the “User Parameters” sections in EZ-PD Device Configuration Utility user manual for further details.

 

Reference Designs and Kit FAQs

 

Question: Which kits are available for CCGx and how can I get these?

 

Answer: The following CCGx development kits are currently available at Cypress website:

  • CY4501 CCG1 Development Kit: The CY4501 CCG1 Development Kit (DVK) is based on the CCG1 product family (CYPD11xx) of Cypress’ USB microcontrollers. This DVK is primarily intended to be a development vehicle for USB host and client systems that house a Type-C connector as well as for EMCA cables. For USB Power Delivery (PD), the host and client boards available in this kit can be configured as a DFP, an UFP, or a DRP. The kit also serves as a vehicle to evaluate several features for USB Type-C, using the SuperSpeed USB demo, DisplayPort demo, and Power Delivery demo as examples.
  • CY4502 EZ-PD™ CCG2 Development Kit: CY4502 enables designers to evaluate the functionality of CCG2 controllers in Type-C EMCA () cables. The CCG2 controller reports the cable characteristics (e.g., current rating) to the Type-C Electronically Marked Cable Assembly (EMCA) Host. This kit contains two CCG2 packages - a 20-ball WLCSP package and a 14-pin DFN package and includes two Type-C plugs and SWD headers for programming each CCG2.

 

Question: What are the reference designs available for CCGx?

 

Answer: Cypress has reference designs available for EMCA and dongles. The reference designs can be found here. Contact Cypress Technical Support for reference schematics of notebook, dock, or monitor applications.

 

Question: Does Cypress provide a MTK for CCGx applications?

 

Answer: Cypress provides a MTK for CCGx cable applications. Contact Cypress technical support for CCGx MTK.

 

Question: How can I establish communication between a legacy PC (without Type-C port) and CCG1 in the CY4501 DVK host board?

 

Answer: The CY4501 DVK consists of an onboard USB-Serial Bridge controller, which can be configured as USB-to-I2C Bridge. The USB-Serial controller acts as a bridge between the PC’s USB interface and CCG1’s I2C interface. Refer to the “Programming over I2C” section in EZ-PD Device Configuration Utility user manual for more details about this hardware and software setup.

 

Question: Which multiplexers can be interfaced with CCGx?

 

Answer: The Cypress USB Type-C controllers can be interfaced with multiplexers/switches from Pericom or Parade. The choice of the multiplexer depends on the type of application you want to build. For example, for USB Type-C to HDMI dongle application we need a switch only on side-band usage (SBU) lines and multiplexing SuperSpeed lines is not required. Contact the multiplexer vendor or Cypress Technical Support for the choice of the multiplexer for a specific application.

 

Question: Can the CY4501 Client board be powered from the Type-C VBUS?

 

Answer: No, it is not possible to power the CCG1 client board from the VBUS of the USB Type-C port. The CCG1 in the CY4501 client board is powered from the USB mini-B port or from the AC adapter.

 

Question: After PD contract is established, what is the maximum and minimum configuration channel (CC) voltage swing?

 

Answer: The USB-PD 2.0 communication is governed by Biphase Mark Coding (BMC) signaling. Before the USB-PD communication starts on the CC line, the voltage on the CC line can swing between 0 V and 5 V. During and after USB-PD communication, the voltage swing of the CC line should fall within 1.05 V to 1.2 V range, with a nominal value of 1.125 V. For more details, refer to the BMC Transmitter Specifications section of the USB-PD spec.

 

Question: How do I route traces for EZ-PD CCG1 and EZ-PD CCG2 using High-Density Interconnect (HDI)?

 

Answer: AN95599 - Hardware Design Guidelines for EZ-PD™ CCG2 discusses the layout recommendations and constraints for the CSP package of EZ-PD CCG1 and EZ-PD CCG2 devices. These guidelines help to ensure the best performance with respect to signal integrity and full electrical compliance with the USB Power Delivery and Type-C specification.

 

Question: What can be the maximum trace length of the CC line?

 

Answer: In any USB system, the trace length of the CC line is constrained by the trace lengths of USB SuperSpeed (SS) and USB High-Speed (HS) signals because they share the same connector. The CC signal of the USB Type C is much lower in frequency (330-kHz max) compared to the SS and HS signals and therefore, there is no critical limitation with respect to the CC signal trace length. However, since VCONN is passed through one of the CC lines, ensure that the IR drop across the VCONN is less than 50 mV.

 

 

Question: What is the function of the VREF pin in the EZ-PD CCG1 Notebook Solution?

 

Answer: The CC signal is an analog signal but carries digital values. Therefore, we need to compare the CC signal against a reference to determine if it is a ‘0’ or a ‘1’. The VREF pin in the EZ-PD CCG1-based Notebook Design is used to provide this reference to compare the CC signal.

 

Question: How can I monitor the signal on the CC line communication with the CY4501 DVK?

 

Answer: The CY4501 Kit (Rev 06) provides external debug headers to monitor the CC line traffic. On the CCG1 host board, pins 8 and 12 from jumper J2 can be used to monitor CC2 and CC1 respectively. Similarly, on the CCG1 client board, pins 8 and 12 from jumper J4 can be used to monitor CC2 and CC1 respectively. The CC pin of either the host or the client board must be connected to the sniffer, which can decode the CC messages.

The design files of the CY4501 CCG1 development kit are available in the following link: http://www.cypress.com/documentation/development-kitsboards/cy4501-ccg1-developmentkit?source=search&cat=software_tools

 

Related Resources

AN96527 - Designing USB Type-C Products Using Cypress's CCG1 Controllers

AN95599 - Hardware Design Guidelines for EZ-PD™ CCG2

 

Document History

 

Document Title:  CCGX FAQs – KBA97244

Document Number: 001-97244

Rev.

ECN No.

  1. Orig. of Change

Description of Change

**

4727810

GORE

New knowledge base article

*A

4966619

GINS

DCON

Made the KBA generic for CCG1 and 2. Added more articles.

Removed Distribution and posting information from Document history page

*B

5180899

GORE

Changed the expected release date of CCG2 SDK from early December 2015 to end of April 2016

*C

5709336

PATI

 

 

 

SLLO

Removed Some Questions which are already available in some other

KBAs

Updated all the queries with the data of CCG3 and CCG4

Added the roadmap for CCG3PA and CCG5

Updated Cypress logo

*D

6211563

VGT

Formatted the FAQs into 5 sections.

Added content from the web page to this KBA